At Kimani Gray’s memorial late Friday night, nearly two weeks after his death. There were at least twenty police on every block, maybe more, from 32 and Church to 55th and Church (and probably going the other way too.)  Imagine if the resources and money for all that policing had gone into education and community investment.  What is there instead is a militarized, occupied, punishing authority, which does not respect the humanity of the people who live there. There is zero mainstream media coverage — as if this story just doesn’t “rate.” What coverage there was immediately went out of its way to smear the victim, to criminalize someone who was just a child. Now little by little, accounts are coming out about who he really was, letters from his school saying what a great student he was, etc. There are also finally, accounts explaining that the two police who shot him have cost the city over two hundred thousand dollars in lawsuits for civil rights violations and police brutality. Why were these “police” still allowed to work after that?  At Kimani Gray’s memorial late Friday night, nearly two weeks after his death. There were at least twenty police on every block, maybe more, from 32 and Church to 55th and Church (and probably going the other way too.)  Imagine if the resources and money for all that policing had gone into education and community investment.  What is there instead is a militarized, occupied, punishing authority, which does not respect the humanity of the people who live there. There is zero mainstream media coverage — as if this story just doesn’t “rate.” What coverage there was immediately went out of its way to smear the victim, to criminalize someone who was just a child. Now little by little, accounts are coming out about who he really was, letters from his school saying what a great student he was, etc. There are also finally, accounts explaining that the two police who shot him have cost the city over two hundred thousand dollars in lawsuits for civil rights violations and police brutality. Why were these “police” still allowed to work after that? 

At Kimani Gray’s memorial late Friday night, nearly two weeks after his death. There were at least twenty police on every block, maybe more, from 32 and Church to 55th and Church (and probably going the other way too.)  Imagine if the resources and money for all that policing had gone into education and community investment.  What is there instead is a militarized, occupied, punishing authority, which does not respect the humanity of the people who live there. There is zero mainstream media coverage — as if this story just doesn’t “rate.” What coverage there was immediately went out of its way to smear the victim, to criminalize someone who was just a child. Now little by little, accounts are coming out about who he really was, letters from his school saying what a great student he was, etc. There are also finally, accounts explaining that the two police who shot him have cost the city over two hundred thousand dollars in lawsuits for civil rights violations and police brutality. Why were these “police” still allowed to work after that? 

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